Emergency repairs explained

As the country moves through the various lockdown levels, a number of motorists are still unsure about what constitutes emergency repairs during Lockdown Level 4.

Jakkie Olivier, CEO of the Retail Motor Industry Organisation (RMI), says members have received a number of queries from motorists in this regard. “What you cannot buy are parts and components that may be considered as cosmetic or not critical and essential to the safe operation of your vehicle. Secondly, no service and maintenance is allowed which is not either overdue in terms of the manufacturer’s specification, or, of an emergency nature,” explains Olivier.

Olivier says emergency repairs essentially cover the fitment, repair, replacement, remanufacturing, and / or the rebuilding of any of the system components listed under the Emergency parts section namely:

  1. An emergency repair is where a vehicle needs a repair to keep it roadworthy.
  2. An emergency repair is where a vehicle needs a repair to keep it safe.
  3. An emergency repair is where a vehicle needs a repair to ensure no one gets injured during the use of the vehicle.
  4. An emergency repair is where a vehicle has had an unexpected failure of a part required to keep it running, or to allow it to get to a place of safety.
  5. Additionally, where scheduled maintenance or a routine service is overdue this would fall into the same category as emergency repair.

Emergency parts cover the items needed in the fitment, repair, replacement, remanufacturing, and / or the rebuilding of any of the system components listed in the Emergency parts section namely:

  1. An emergency part or component is a part or component essential to keep it Roadworthy.
  2. An emergency part or component is a part or component essential to keep it
  3. An emergency part or component is a part or component essential to ensure no one gets injured during the use of the vehicle.
  4. An emergency part or component is where a vehicle has had an unexpected failure of a part required to keep it running, or to allow it to get to a place of safety.
  5. Parts and components required for scheduled maintenance or a routine service, which is overdue, would fall into the same category emergency parts

The Parts list could include,  but would not be limited to any service or repair, related parts considered as components of engine components; cooling system components; drive train components; auto-electrical components; suspension components; gearbox components; glass and windscreens; fuel system components; lubrication system components; tyres, rims and related services; brake and clutch components and towbars.

“The South Africa car park is generally an aging car park with 83% of all vehicles over the age of five years old so maintenance is critical. Motorists need to ensure their car remain roadworthy. Roadworthiness and road safety need to be priorities for all South Africans. At this point we are not sure if the same restrictions will apply from 1 June. We are hoping the definition can be expanded to include more than just emergency repairs when we move to Level 3,” concludes Olivier.

ENDS